Ich – eine Werbung

Nachstellen der omnipräsenten Werbekampagne mit Claudia Schiffer vom Winter 2001, die zu dieser Zeit in der gesamten Bundesrepublik die Stadtbilder dominierte. Diese Arbeit wurde in den Fenstern des Kulturkaufhaus Dussmann in Berlin und der University of Arts in Philadelphia ausgestellt.

Nachstellen der Werbekampagne von H&M mit Claudia Schiffer vom Winter 2001.

 

clau-7-3

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002 Fotografien für ein Faltblatt und Poster, DIN A2, Offset-Druck, 4/4-farbig, Digital Prints, 110 x 140 cm

 

Dussmann2

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Digital Prints, 110 x 140 cm

 

claudia8

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Digital Prints, 110 x 140 cm

 

claudia6

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Digital Prints, 110 x 140 cm

 

claudia5

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Digital Prints, 110 x 140 cm

 

claudia4

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Digital Prints, 110 x 140 cm

 

claudia1

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Digital Prints, 110 x 140 cm

 

Window-Broad03

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2004, Installation View, Rosenwald Wolff Gallery, Windows on Broad, Philadelphia

 

Dussmann-1

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Installation View, Schaufenster Kulturkaufhaus Dussmann

 

Dussmann-2neu

ICH – Eine Werbung, 2002, Installation View, Schaufenster Kulturkaufhaus Dussmann

 

Me – by Stefka Ammon

Everday when I walk to work, I pass Stefka Ammon. No matter the weather, she is always dressed in pink, opaque bra and panties. Her short hair’s disheveled, and her face is broken out and shiny. She looks like she’s just woken up.

Ammon, a German artist isn’t actually standing outside. But her three large photographic selfportraits, which are singularily unflattering, loom from the alternative art-space Window on Broad next to the new Starbucks at Broad and Pine.
It’s an interesting juxtaposition – a brave meditation on notions of beauty and reality next to a commodified stunted take on community interaction. As far as braving the world without artifice, what Ammon’s doing isn’t new.

Art school feminists have long tried to demystify the human body with revealing and unforgiving self-portraits, and even Victoria’s Secret model Tyra Banks did a whole book in which she showed herself without makeup.

But there’s something about seeing Ammon’s photos on a busy street that makes you uncomfortable. Is she shameful or sexual? Would you have the nerve to do that? Would you rather get a latte? Decide for yourself.

Liz Spykol, Philadelphia Weekly, A-List “ARTS”, Sunday,
Nov. 30st, 2003